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"But would you kindly ponder this question: What would your good do if evil didn’t exist, and what would the earth look like if all the shadows disappeared? After all, shadows are cast by things and people. Here is the shadow of my sword. But shadows also come from trees and living beings. Do you want to strip the earth of all trees and living things just because of your fantasy of enjoying naked light?You’re stupid."

— Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita (via quoted-books)

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todaysdocument:


"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."
-Franklin D. Roosevelt
"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945
From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

todaysdocument:

"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."

-Franklin D. Roosevelt

"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945

From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

(via deadpresidents)

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"The tongue may hide the truth but the eyes—never!"

— Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

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"

After experiencing the beauty of traveling throughout this region, where men and women work and raise their families, where children play and the elderly dream, I now find myself here, in this place, able to say only one thing: War is madness.

Whereas God carries forward the work of creation, and we men and women are called to participate in his work, war destroys. It also runs the most beautiful work of his hands: human beings. War ruins everything, even the bonds between brothers. War is irrational; it’s only plan is to bring destruction; it seeks to grow by destroying.

Greed, intolerance, the lust for power — these motives underlie the decision to go to war, and they are too often justified by an ideology; but first there is a distorted passion or impulse. Ideology is presented as a justification and when there is no ideology, there is the response of Cain: ‘What does it matter to me? Am I my brother’s keeper?’ War does not look directly at anyone, be they elderly, children, mothers, fathers. ‘What does it matter to me?’

Above the entrance to this cemetery, there hangs in the air those ironic words of war, ‘What does it matter to me?’ Each one of the dead buried here had their owns plans, their own dreams, but their lives were cut short. Humanity said, ‘What does it matter to me?’

Even today, after the second failure of another world war, perhaps one can speak of a third war, one fought piecemeal, with crimes, massacres, destruction. In all honesty, the front page of newspapers ought to carry the headline, ‘What does it matter to me?’ Cain would say, ‘Am I my brother’s keeper?’…

…Here lie many victims. Today, we remember them. There are tears, there is sadness. From this place we remember all the victims of every war.

Today, too, the victims are many. How is this possible? It is so because in today’s world, behind the scenes, there are interests, geopolitical strategies, lust for money and power, and there is the manufacture and sale of arms, which seem to be so important!

And these plotters of terrorism, these schemers of conflicts, just like arms dealers, have engraved in their hearts, ‘What does it matter to me?’ It is the task of the wise to recognize errors, to feel pain, to repent, to beg for pardon and to cry.

With this ‘What does it matter to me?’ in their hearts, the merchants of war perhaps have made a great deal of money. but their corrupted hearts have lost the capacity to cry. That ‘What does it matter to me?’ prevents the tears. Cain did not cry. The shadow of Cain hangs over us today in this cemetery. It is seen here. It is seen from 1914 right up to our own time. It is seen even in the present.

With the heart of a son, a brother, a father, I ask each of you, indeed for all of us, to have a conversion of heart; to move on from ‘What does it matter to me?’, to tears: for each one of the fallen of this ‘senseless massacre’, for all the victims of the mindless wars, in every age.

Humanity needs to weep, and this is the time to weep.

"

Pope Francis, homily at Sacrario Militare di Redipuglia, Redipuglia, Italy, September 13, 2014.

(I just needed to post this again.)

(Source: deadpresidents)

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Quote
"Find meaning. Distinguish melancholy from sadness. Go out for a walk. It doesn’t have to be a romantic walk in the park, spring at its most spectacular moment, flowers and smells and outstanding poetical imagery smoothly transferring you into another world. It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter. Do not be afraid of spending quality time by yourself. Find meaning or don’t find meaning but “steal” some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self. Opt for privacy and solitude. That doesn’t make you antisocial or cause you to reject the rest of the world. But you need to breathe. And you need to be."

— Albert Camus, Notebooks, 1951-1959 (via starrywavves)

(Source: 2cleopatras, via fuckyeahexistentialism)

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retrocampaigns:

In case you were still undecided on this year’s Halloween costume.
Barry Goldwater paper mask via the Kentucky Historical Society, KHS Museum Collection

retrocampaigns:

In case you were still undecided on this year’s Halloween costume.

Barry Goldwater paper mask via the Kentucky Historical Society, KHS Museum Collection

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"stumbling up at one
and put the kettle on
but where’s the coffee gone
in the afternoon
I put the TV on
but where’s the drama gone
in the afternoon
and time is all that passes"

— In the afternoon- The cardigans

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"If you stare at the center of the universe, there is a coldness there. A blankness. Ultimately, the universe doesn’t care about us. Time doesn’t care about us. 
That’s why we have to care about each other."

— David Levithan, Every Day (via bookmania)

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deadpresidents:

imathers:

king-grandma:

sarajevomoja:

David Suzuki in this interview about facing the reality of climate change and other environmental issues from Moyers & Company.

wow this is so true

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Of course, as everything from our games to the fucked-up history of our social mores to our politics to our art tells you, if there’s one thing humans excel at, one thing that might actually separate us from other animals (although there may be counterexamples, I’d be fascinated to hear about them!), it’s that we are so excellent at treating the things we invent as if they were immutable facts of the universe.

(Which is to say I agree with Suzuki but I also kind of despair at our ability to actually, en masse, do anything along these lines?)

I agree with Suzuki and I agree with Ian.

I believe that there are far too many people that don’t understand that ideas evolve because there are far too many people that don’t believe that nature evolves. For example, here in the United States, too many people don’t recognize that the Founders didn’t expect the Constitution to be taken literally, as it was written in 1787; it’s an organic, living document. That’s why the Framers packaged it with a mechanism allowing for amendments. But people are instinctually repelled by change, even if it is changing something that we have created. And the key word is "instinctual" rather than "instinctive"; it’s not something we can’t do, it’s not something we don’t do, and it’s not something we haven’t done before — it’s something we choose not to do. It’s not natural, it’s learned. It’s not singular, it’s shared behavior. It’s also frightening because we are a society driven by the rule of the majority, and the thinking of the majority isn’t necessarily rational, reasonable, or what’s best for all.